‘No-Deal’ Brexit – Should the food and drink industry be stockpiling ingredients?

Nov 15 2018

We are fast approaching the day when the UK is scheduled to leave the European Union and recent surveys conducted by the Food and Drink Federation reveal that more and more food and drink manufacturers who were surveyed are reporting an increase in costs as a result of stockpiling ahead of a possible ‘no-deal’ Brexit.

Currently the UK’s demand for sugar is around 2 million tonnes annually and the World Health Organisation’s statistics reveal that, in the UK, an average adults’ daily sugar consumption sits at 93.2 grams. So, imagine how much sugar would need to be stockpiled to keep Britain’s sweet tooth satisfied? But, what would be the cost of stockpiling and where would the stock be housed? The ultimate question is that if we find ourselves in a ‘no-deal’ Brexit situation who will fit the bill for the tariff increases; the suppliers or the customers?

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries

 

As it stands the UK food and drink industry does not have the infrastructure to support the amount of stockpiling which could be needed. Yes, we’ve all heard Theresa May saying she’s set out plans to stockpile food in the event of a ‘no-deal’ and that the public should take “reassurance and comfort” from that, but the industry remains unconvinced. Chief Executive of the Food Storage and Distribution Federation, Shane Brennan has said that, “we do not have warehouse capacity (to stockpile), never have, never will. There is no stockpiling scenario, this idea that the government is meeting the industry to discuss a grand plan is not something we or anyone else we deal with is involved in.

At the moment the food and drink industries are a finely-tuned machine. Years have been spent streamlining the industry to improve efficiency and suppliers are already using their limited storage space at full capacity, increasing space would be extremely costly; just finding the additional space would prove difficult.

Recent news has emerged that as a precautionary and protective measure one of the world’s largest snack companies, Mondelēz International Inc, will stockpile key ingredients that are essential in the production of their products, in case the UK finds itself it a ‘no-deal’ Brexit situation.

Confectionery giant Cadbury’s has also been stockpiling large amounts of ingredients, chocolates and biscuits too. Hubert Weber, the European boss of Cadbury’s, has been quoted as saying the UK is “not self-sufficient in terms of food ingredients. Like the whole of the food and drink industry in the UK, we would prefer a good deal that allows the free flow of products, as that would have less of an impact to the UK consumer.”

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries

 

Back in July, Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab said that the government is making plans to secure food supply in the event of a ‘no-deal’ Brexit, however, he said it was “wrong to describe it as the Government doing the stockpiling”, which means that industries would need to take the lead.

So, yet again, the Government is passing the responsibility onto the food and drink suppliers and manufacturers to sort out the situation. However, there is only so much the industries can do though as Aldi’s Chief Executive Giles Hurley, says, “the storage of additional stock is worth considering (but) based on storage and shelf life that would be very challenging.” Hubert Weber, agrees that even though stockpiling is essential until we know the outcome, “you can only do so much because of the shelf life of products”, and the capacity of the storage units. Also, smaller companies and individual producers may find it hard to stockpile or increase order sizes as they may not have the funds to buy in surplus or to find the space to store stocks; thus, for some companies it does not make economic sense to order more reserves.

A recent report presented to the Scottish Government by the FDF, reveals food and drink companies are extremely ‘nervous’ due to the uncertainty over the outcome of Brexit. Suppliers are running up huge expenses stockpiling food and ingredients in order to minimise disruption as the March deadline fast approaches. This latest research from the Food and Drink Federation has revealed that 38% of food and drink manufacturers are already reporting an increase in costs as a direct result of stockpiling ahead of a possible ‘no-deal’ Brexit. FDF Chief Executive Ian Wright says that ‘these results tell us just how seriously the food and drink industry take a ‘no-deal’ Brexit. It is a grisly prospect to which we edge closer every passing day.”

Ragus has been questioned by our own customers as to whether we will be stockpiling our products and we want to reassure our clients that we do have a certain amount sugar reserves in place, but until politicians thrash out a clear deal we will not know exactly what the outcome is, at the moment the discussions are all speculative, we have to wait for tangible facts before the whole situation can be processed. Gordon Polson, director of the Federation of Bakers has said, “just like everybody else, we are living with uncertainty and lack of clarity and the sooner that we do have some clarity, the better.”

As Ian Wright CBE, FDF Chief Executive says, “the budget announcement from the Chancellor – with measures to support productivity, exports, enterprise and investment – offers some respite for our SME food and drink manufacturers,” but right now we have to wait it out until the Government can bring us more news.

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From Plant to Plate- How Do We Get Our Sugar?

Nov 08 2018

Have you ever wondered where the sugar we use in the UK comes from? In the UK our sugar comes from two source, sugar cane and sugar beet. Two very different looking plants which have to be grown and harvested so that the sugar can be extracted from them. Sugar beet and sugar cane produce and store enough sugar that we can grow them specifically for their sugars.

Sugar cane is a tall tropical grass that reaches a height of 4 to 5 metres. To grow, it requires ample rainfall and abundant sunshine in the summer and mild winters. It’s generally found in countries like Brazil, Cuba, India, Mauritius and the West Indies. The sugar is stored in the stalks of the cane and is produced by the process of photosynthesis.

Beet, on the other hand, grows in temperate climates and is a root crop grown in the ground. Sugar Beet is grown throughout Europe, UK, Canada, Russian and China; in the UK it is grown mainly in Lincolnshire and East Anglia.

In order to get the sugar that we use on a daily basis, both cane and beet are grown, harvested and processed; however, the processes for removing the sugar from each plant is done in different ways.

Ragus gets most of its raw materials from natural sugar cane, thus here are the various techniques and processes used to extract the sugar from sugar cane.

Sugar from Cane

Sugar cane plants grow for 3-4 years, per crop, in plantations in hot tropical climates.

When matured, the cane is harvested, and the leaves are stripped ready to be taken to the processing mills.

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 

The Sugar Mill:

Juice Extraction
At the mill the cane stalks are washed, cut up and shredded, and juice is pressed from them using high pressure rollers. Hot water is added to improve juice extraction; the remaining dry stalks (bagasse) are burnt in the mill’s boilers to produce sustainable electricity.

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 

Juice Purification
The sweet natural juice is heated to 80°C and lime is added to purify and neutralise it. Fine fibre particles form a scum on the juice surface; other mineral matter sticks to the lime and settles as sediment. These solids are filtered from the juice and returned to the cane fields as natural fertiliser.
Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 

Evaporation
Evaporators then boil the raw juice in a vacuum, heating it to a temperature of between 70°C and 130°C for up to two hours. This evaporates the natural water, creating a very sweet thick amber juice.

Crystallisation
The amber juice is then seeded with tiny sugar crystals, and again boiled under vacuum, which allows the crystals to grow to create a super-saturated massecuite syrup. During this process the natural raw colour, flavour and aroma of molasses is formed.

Sugar separation
Centrifugal machines spin the massecuite syrup (at 1,050 rpm) for two minutes to separate the crystals from the liquid. The separated syrup still contains a lot of sugar, so it’s spun four times to extract the maximum amount of raw sugar. The first and second spins produce sugar, shipped in bulk for white sugar refining. The third and fourth spins are mixed with a magma of molasses to produce affinated and muscovado sugars, used to produce special sugars.

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 

Drying, Sieving & Bagging
Once the sugar crystals are separated, they enter a drum rotating drier and are cooled. Raw sugar is loaded into lorries for delivery to the port terminal. Special sugars are passed over a vibrating screen and through a rare earth magnet, to remove foreign particles, before being packed into bags and shipped accordingly.

Here at Ragus, our UK sugar manufacturing facility, is one of the world’s most advanced sugar manufacturing sites producing hundreds of tonnes of sugars and syrups each day – from unrefined Demerara sugars, to refiners syrups, molasses and treacles to blends incorporating glucose syrups and many, many more. These include highly specialised custom formulations created by our sugar experts to meet customer demands.

Ragus Fun Fact:
We source our sugars from certified supplier mills and refineries all over the world. The sugar arrives in thousand kilo bags inside metal cargo containers, which are taken directly from the ships to our Berkshire factory. Continue Reading »

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From Field to Fork

Nov 01 2018

Have you ever wondered where the sugar we use in the UK comes from? Currently the UK’s demand for sugar is around 2 million tonnes annually, but recent polls reveal that British shoppers do not know where the sugar in their food, drink and pharmaceutical products actually comes from.

In the UK our sugar comes from two sources, sugar cane and sugar beet. Two very different looking plants which have to be grown and harvested so that the sugar can be extracted from them. Sugar beet and sugar cane produce and store enough sugar that we can grow them specifically for their sugars.

Sugar Beet is grown throughout Europe, UK, Canada, Russian and China; in the UK it is grown mainly in Lincolnshire and East Anglia.

Beet needs to grow in temperate climates and is a root crop grown in the ground. A mature sugar beet grows to about one foot long, weighs between two to five pounds, and contains about 18% sucrose, which is concentrated in its taproot. In order to get the sugar that we use on a daily basis, both cane and beet are grown, harvested and processed; however, the processes for removing the sugar from each plant is done is different ways.

Beet sugar being grown; Ragus supports all its farmers and producers with advice and support on how to optimiseefficiencies, and promote the cause of sustainable sugar production

 

The History of Sugar Beet:
European sugar beet dates back to the 16th century when French soil scientist Olivier de Serres found that some beet substances could be processed to a state that very much resembled sucrose fluid, the same substance found in sugarcane. Then, in mid 1700s German physicist Andreas Sigismund Marggraf confirmed the presence of sugar in beet, and in 1784, his student Franz Karl Achard managed to establish the first beet sugar processing plant; thus, the European sugar beet industry was born. In 1900 between 60% and 90% of raw sugar bought into the UK for refining was beet sugar from Austria and Germany. During the First World War nearly all raw sugar switched to cane sugar, the rationing quotas of which was controlled by Charles Eastick, founder of Ragus, who was awarded the M.B.E. for his service. Charles realised Britain’s vulnerability in the supply of sugar, so as the need was great, we started to grow our own beet.

How do we get Sugar from Sugar Beet?

The Field:
Sugar beet is a biennial plant which builds up a store of sugar in its roots during the first year of its biological cycle, then in the second year it uses its stored sugar to flower and seed. However, it is at the end of the first year that the beet is harvested to extract the sugar.

The beet seeds are sown in Mid-March and then the crop is harvested in September – December. To harvest the beet, the farmers cut off the green tops, remove the beets from the ground, cleans them and they are then put on trailers. The green tops are not wasted, they are used for animal feeds or as fertilizer.

Beet sugar being grown; Ragus supports all its farmers and producers with advice and support on how to optimiseefficiencies, and promote the cause of sustainable sugar production

The Sugar Factory:
· Once harvested, the beet is transported to sugar factories where the beet is washed and sliced.
· The beet slices are placed into a huge rotating cylinder full of hot water as the sugar needs to be separated from the rest of the plant.
· The sugar diffuses out of the beet slices into the hot water, leaving a sugar bearing juice which is heated, together with lime and carbon dioxide gas, to form a chalk/calcium carbonate, in order to remove the non-sugar materials from the liquid; this is known as carbonatation.
· A pale-yellow sparkling juice is left, which is then gassed further in another tank (2nd Carbonatation) and filtered.
·The water is then boiled off from this yellow juice in steam heated evaporators to form a thick syrup.
· The thick syrup is then concentrated in vacuum tanks where the sugar crystals are formed; any remaining residual syrup is removed from the finished crystals in a centrifuge.
The remaining crystals are then washed and dried, leaving the white sugar that we know and use.
· There is no wastage with sugar beet, the remains of the beet once the juice is extracted, is used to make animal feed.
· When beet is processed correctly there is no difference between the white sugar extracted from beet to that of cane.

Ragus Facts:
We provide a complete service – from scouring the globe for the best and most sustainable sources of beet and pure cane sugar to manufacturing a wide range of sugars products and delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the world. Our products span pure sugars and syrups to special formulations created by our expert team on site at our laboratory in the UK.

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Treacle, Molasses And Golden Syrup – The Perfect Ingredients To Bake A Parkin Cake

Oct 25 2018

Bonfire night is fast approaching and here at Ragus we are busy manufacturing tonnes of black treacle, muscovado sugar, molasses and golden syrup to be shipped out to our many bakery, cake and dessert manufacturer clients ready for baking and creating their Parkin and ginger cakes. ** See below for our Parkin Cake recipe.

Originating in the North of England, typically Lancashire and Yorkshire, Parkin is a strongly spiced gingerbread cake traditionally eaten on Guy Fawkes Night and made with oatmeal and black treacle; two of the key ingredients are treacle and golden syrup.

The idea of Parkin is said to have been created during the Industrial Revolution by working-class folk as oats and treacle were an important part of their diets in those times. Workers were on low incomes and spent long hours at work, returning home with little energy, so they needed cheap, energy dense food, to survive the long days. Oatmeal was the main cereal crop in the Northern climate and black treacle was easily available as it was imported from the West Indies through the ports of Liverpool and Hull.

Ragus produce a wide range of Pure Sugar products at its world-leading sugar manufacturing site in the UK, including sugars, refiner’s syrups, treacle and Molasses.  Ragus’ manufacturing site produces hundreds of tonnes of sugars and syrups each day, all manufactured to the highest quality to ensure customers’ specifications are met.

 

Many people are confused by the differences between treacle and molasses, but for all intents and purposes they are the same. Ragus produces and supplies molasses, treacle and golden syrup as ingredients to food, drink and pharmaceutical companies for taste, texture and appearance, so here’s some useful information into our formulations and what products they can be used in:

· Ragus’ Golden Syrup
This is a traditional golden syrup made from natural sugars. It’s a partially inverted syrup with a sweetness value approximately 20% greater than sucrose, a distinctive, subtle colour, and a mellow flavour. It’s used as a humectant and to reduce crystallisation, which allows it to withstand higher baking temperatures for biscuits and cakes, as well as flapjacks and puddings. It contains no added flavours or colours.

· Ragus’ Black Treacle
Black Treacle No.1 is a mixture of 50% refiner’s syrup and 50% molasses. It has a robust flavour similar to Cane Treacle, with a more rounded, smoother flavour than molasses. It is used in rich bakery products, Christmas puddings and rich fruit cakes. Black Treacle No.1 is also used as a natural food colorant.

· Ragus’ Cane Molasses
Cane Molasses is extracted from the juice residues created when sugar cane juice is boiled to extract as much sucrose as possible. These residues are very dark and contain trace minerals, as well as invert sugars, and colours that make up the natural raw flavour and aroma of cane molasses. It has a strong, robust, bittersweet flavour suited to Christmas puddings, toffee, savoury sauces and cooking marinades. Cane Molasses is also used as a natural food colorant and a dietary supplement.

Ragus produce a wide range of Pure Sugar products at its world-leading sugar manufacturing site in the UK, including sugars, refiner’s syrups, treacle and Molasses.  Ragus’ manufacturing site produces hundreds of tonnes of sugars and syrups each day, all manufactured to the highest quality to ensure customers’ specifications are met.

 

Parkin Cake Recipe:

Preparation: 20 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour

Ingredients

· 200g Ragus’ Golden Syrup
· 85g Ragus’ Black Treacle
· 85g Ragus’ Dark Muscovado/Brown Soft Sugar
· 200g soft butter (extra for greasing tin)
· 4 tbsp Milk
· 1 Large Egg
· 100g Oatmeal
· 250g Self-Raising Flour
· 1 tbsp Ground Ginger

Method
· Pre-heat oven to 160C
· Grease square cake tin (line with parchment paper)
· Beat together milk and egg.
· Melt together the syrup, treacle, butter and sugar, stirring continuously until a smooth liquid forms, then remove from heat.
· Mix together the flour, oats and ginger, then add to the syrup mixture stirring constantly. Add the egg and milk mixture.
· Spoon mixture into tin and bake for 50 minutes – 1 hour or until the cake is crusty on top and feels firm.
· Cool and enjoy – *A Parkin cake can last up to 2 weeks and becomes stickier the longer its left!

At Ragus we are specialists in high quality natural pure sugars and pure syrups, from raw cane sugar to specialist glucose-sugar blends. To choose the right molasses and treacles for your ingredients, visit our online Product Finder, our new, simple product tool, where you can filter through over 50 different sugars to find the right product for your industry: http://ragus.co.uk/product-finder/

Ragus Fun Fact:

Established in 1928, Ragus today are a leading supplier in the production of brown sugars, syrups and treacles for major food, drink and pharmaceutical companies.

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Getting to Know Ragus – Our Policies and Procedures!

Oct 15 2018

Ragus recently celebrated its 90th Birthday, a major achievement for a family run British company which opened in 1928. Since its beginnings Ragus has gone from strength to strength and we now run a full-service global operation. Our multi-million-pound state-of-the-art factory supplies hundreds of tonnes of pure sugar products to customers all over the world every day.

Part of our success is that Ragus operates strict regulation policies and procedures in terms of quality control, safety and workforce etiquette, to ensure that our various departments work together effectively and efficiently to maximise our output, thus ensuring we meet our customers’ specifications; all our pure sugar products are manufactured to the highest quality.

Meet Ibrahim, Ragus’ Quality Control Manager, who has been with the company for just over a year. Ibrahim has worked in the food and drink industry for over 20 years, so his wealth of knowledge and experience is a great asset to Ragus.

What are your responsibilities as a Quality Control Manager?

“Everything!!! As a Quality Control Manager, I am in charge of product quality, hygiene, food safety, audits, certification, goods in and out, the laboratory, software managing and raw materials.”

You mentioned being in charge of the laboratory. Why does Ragus need a laboratory?

“Our lab tests incoming raw materials as well as every batch and every product produced in the factory for technical analysis, taste, texture and appearance; our products are produced consistently to meet our customers’ bespoke requirements and I am responsible for overseeing the laboratory; I have to make sure this process runs smoothly and effectively. We also keep samples for a minimum of eighteen months for full traceability, so they have to be stored correctly and in specific batch orders.”

Raw cane sugar manufactured by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries

 

Ragus’ facility, is one of the world’s most advanced sugar manufacturing sites producing hundreds of tonnes of sugars and syrups each day, what hygiene and food safety standards do you have to adhere by?

“Hygiene and food safety is a major part of my responsibilities, my teams in the factory report to me on a daily basis; our facilities must be kept to a high standard of cleanliness at all times. I have to inspect the factory daily and if any area has not, for any reason, been given the right attention to detail I make sure it is rectified immediately.

Much of our machinery has been custom-engineered, creating a site that adheres to all major European manufacturing standards (including BRC and ISO 9001); the International Organisation for Standardisation check everything in the factory regularly so I have to ensure everything is correct and in order at all times. Every year Ragus has to renew its certifications and be checked by the ISO; we have always passed their rigorous rules and regulations.”

You said you were in charge of audits. What does this entail?

“Yes, I am in charge of making sure we pass our own internal audits. I also visit suppliers, clients and other manufacturing plants we work with to run our own audits on them to ensure they meet all our requirements. We have recently (September 2018), had an audit from the BRC (British Retailer Consortium); this external board came into our factory and went through all of our processes to make sure our systems are adhering and working to the right BRC standards.

Other examples of an audits, that we must pass, are the Organic and Fairtrade standards; our organic products must be fully compliant with organic regulations, made with raw materials grown according to organic principles and free from artificial preservatives, colours and flavours. There is also the Halal Food & Kosher Certification; our food products have to be safe for specific cultural and religious dietary requirements.”

Where does Ragus source its raw materials from?

“Ragus produces sugars and syrups using raw/white sugar cane from numerous countries in Americas (Cuba, Argentina, Guadeloupe, Guatemala), Africa (Malawi, Mauritius, Algeria, Mozambique) and Asia (India, Dubai) to name but a few. We also acquire our sugar beets from UK/EU sources. Our raw materials are soured from certified suppliers and we build long-term relationships with our suppliers.

Ragus is also able to offer both Organic and Fairtrade versions of the majority of its products and we can produce an organic alternative to just about any sugar formulation.”

Raw cane sugar manufactured by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries

 

What is the process of taking raw materials and goods into the factory?

“Since being at Ragus I have created an incoming tanker checklist as any products entering our facilities have to undergo numerous safety checks; all raw materials have to be checked for pests, debris, odours etc. These checks include; weighing vehicles, checking paperwork is correct, making sure all security seals are intact, the tankers all have clean, capped hoses, and all deliveries have to have samples that are tested in our own laboratories, to name but a few! Safety and hygiene is our utmost importance as our products are for human consumption.”

In terms of delivering our products to customers, what is Ragus’ policy?

“Working in partnership with our suppliers and customers around the world, we deliver on time and in full. All our products are put through safety checks before they leave our facilities, we have specific machinery that check for any debris or foreign objects. All products are sealed, wrapped and stamped adequately and to specification.

We also use the latest logistics technologies to plan deliveries and achieve industry-leading delivery performance standards for on-time and in-full order fulfilment.”

Thanks Ibrahim…

A Ragus Sugars Fact:
Did you know that our factory operates around highly efficient workflows ensuring that we accurately coordinate the production, packing and shipment of hundreds of tonnes of pure sugars, syrups and special sugar formulations on a daily basis?

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UK SUGAR INDUSTRY CONCERNS OVER POST BREXIT

Oct 08 2018

In just over 6 months, the UK will cease being a member of the EU, which will completely change the way our country is run; all industries will be affected in one way or another, and one of the biggest shake-ups will be what happens to the UK’s food and drink sector.

At the moment 70% of UK food and non-alcoholic drink imports and exports are accounted for by the EU, and since we are currently part of the EU internal market, there is zero-tariff trade on goods, plus no border checks, custom duties or inspection; obviously this will change once we leave the EU.

Tractor-brexit-670

 

At Ragus, we are leading suppliers in the pure sugar market so what happens when we leave the EU is a subject that is high on our agenda and we want to support the UK sugar industry as much as we already do. According to Greg Hands, the Minister of State for Trade Policy, he insists that the UK is committed to keeping a mix of beet and cane sugar supplies once it leaves the EU, and that the Government will seek a procedure where cane and beet sugar will be ’able to compete on an equal basis’; he adds that the UK sugar beet sector is ’one of the most competitive in the world’.

As it currently stands, 60% of the sugar consumed in Britain comes from sugar beet grown and processed in the UK & EU. The remaining 40% of sugar, consumed in the UK, comes from raw sugar cane which is grown outside the EU in countries like Brazil, China and India, and is subject to import tariffs. However, the worry from domestic beet growers, once the UK leaves the EU, is that the UK Government could relax or even abandon its support for home grown beet sugar, favouring transactions between private parties which are free from government intervention such as regulation, privileges, tariffs and subsidies. Thus, allowing food and drink companies and manufacturers to approach their suppliers directly from overseas; if this happens then the percentage of the sugar consumed in Britain that comes from home grown sugar beet could decline.

Beet-brexit

 

Also, at the moment 2 million EU nationals work in the UK, that includes almost half a million in the food and drink supply chain; a third of whom work in manufacturing. Plus, over 50,000 are employed on a seasonal basis in farming and agriculture; thus, it isn’t just imports and exports that will be affected if the Government can’t put their visions into place, it’s our workforce too!

No one can yet predict the future, so it comes down to a case of having to wait and see what the future of UK sugar supply will be. Greg Hands offers the promise of continuing support for UK beet growers, but only time will tell!

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